Tuesday, June 14, 2011

The date rape drug hoax that just won't die

When the legend becomes fact, old cowboys and feminists alike insist on printing the legend. The date rape drug myth persists even though it was long ago debunked.

Three teen girls, ages 16 and 17, reported that their drinks had been spiked with a "date rape" drug at a dance party.  Not so, police say. Tests found they were two and a half to three times over the legal adult alcohol limit, and their "was solely as a result of excessive drinking." See here.

Date rape drug hysteria was all the rage a couple of years ago. It's died down some, but the myth won't die.  The date rape drug hysteria is a chilling microcosm of our modern false rape culture where women are told they have no personal responsibility for their actions.

Consider that a study published in the British Journal of Criminology a couple of years ago found that three-quarters of students surveyed identified drink spiking as an important risk – more than alcohol.  More than half said they knew someone whose drink had been spiked.  And it was all a lie. See here.  That's right. Hokum. A delicious feminist canard, dripping with stardust feminist wishfulness. Despite popular beliefs, there is no evidence that rape victims are commonly drugged with such substances, researchers say. None. Yet it is doubtful that the purveyors of misandry in the sexual grievance industry will ever remove this hoax from their rape "facts" catalog, along with the two percent canard, and the one-in-four lie, because it's much more fun to blame your failures on some innocent man or boy. (Innocent men and boys, of course, do not have this vile luxury.)

One of the authors of the study referenced above explained: “'Young women appear to be displacing their anxieties about the consequences of consuming what is in the bottle on to rumors of what could be put there by someone else . . . .'” See here.

But the studies only confirmed what the law enforcement officials in the trenches have long reported. “Most weekends," said a detective inspector, "we . . . have a report from somebody saying their drink has been spiked with rohypnol – while we have had cases where women have been drugged these are extremely rare. We actually have significantly less genuine rape cases than those reported . . . ." See here.

What was behind the date rape drug hysteria?  Women groping for "an alibi for their conduct." See here.

The date rape drug hysteria was so strong that people even believed a viral e-mail that claimed men were passing a very powerful date rape drug to women merely by handing them a business card. The drug supposedly was so potent that it incapacitated women who merely touched it. The card ended by urging the reader "TO SEND THIS E-MAIL TO EVERY WOMAN YOU KNOW." Of course, the email was a hoax, an urban myth. See here.

Even entities that ought to know better bought into the date rape drug hysteria. When drug companies were considering marketing Oxytocin, a natural hormone and neurotransmitter that increases trust and strengthens bonding in personal relationships, some scientists expressed "fear that these feelings can be abused . . . [and that] the hormone could be used as a date rape drug by inducing false feelings of security." See here.

Date rape drug hysteria, like the campus rape myth, is a morality tale, a story about personal responsibility, and about how one gender is told it doesn't have any. Here is the unvarnished truth: to the extent unwanted sex is a problem on campus, it's usually more accurately characterized as drunken sex, not rape. Why, pray tell, is she the "victim" when a young couple mutually decides to drink to excess -- which is common -- and then mutually decides, in their mutually reduced state of consciousness, to have sex?  In that scenario, he's every bit as much a "victim" as she is. (And, no, I don't think they both should be charged with rape: the mutuality of their stupidity cancels out their shared criminality.) Women and men frequently drink to lower their inhibitions precisely so that they will engage in sexual activity. To pretend otherwise is to toss eons of accumulated knowledge about gender relations onto a scrapheap of politicized indifference.

Women's groups have insisted for decades that women are at least as capable as the guys in every sphere of life -- in the law, medicine, the military, government, you name it. Everywhere except the boudoir, where it's 1950 all over again, all the time, and women are as helpless as the most distressed of Disney damsels. Yet we pretend we are empowering our daughters by telling them they are powerless.

Drunken women are the authors of their own discontent, not some date rape drug, and not our sons. It's time we started to treat our adult daughters like adults before they destroy another innocent young man.