Tuesday, April 28, 2009

Must-read story: Police say half or more rape reports are false in some places, they just don't care to do anything about it

Comment: The story below this comment could be used to teach False Rape Claims 101. Before you read it, you need to understand a few things.

By now, readers of this blog understand that to discern the truth about the prevalence of false rape claims, you often have to dig through mounds of dung in mainstream media reports because newspapers are far too reliant on rape advocacy groups for their "information."

The following news report is rare in that the reporter tries to be even-handed.

"It's just a fact, in sexual assault investigations, that we have false reports," said Tulsa Police Sgt. Gary Stansill of the Sex Crimes Unit.

Really? Because sexual assault counselors -- who, unlike the police, are not in the trenches solving crimes -- say false rape claims are "a myth."

Wait. Here's where the story gets really interesting.

"False rape reports are a big taboo subject. Advocate groups estimate only 2% are false . . . ." Let's stop there for a second. Note that the reporter attributes the standard two percent false rape claim canard (long ago debunked as lacking in evidentiary support -- see this law review article, which traced the two percent claim to it's baseless source) not to a "nonprofit" group with a noble-sounding name, as is often the case, but to "advocate groups." And that is an accurate description, because that is what those groups are. More accurate would be to describe them as "groups fomenting rape hysteria to justify their existence," but let's not split hairs.

Wait. The story gets even better:

". . . but police departments believe it's [false rape reporting] much higher, in some places, half or more."

Did you get that? Hell, one would think that this blog put them up to saying that -- because that's the same conclusion we've reached on our own. When we posit that same conclusion, we are accused of misogyny and some people wish us to be brutally raped.

Up to half or more of all false rape claims in some places are likely false. Re-read it. Copy it. Cut it out. Put it on your refrigerator.

Now, I wonder who we should believe -- advocate groups, or the police? Hmm. That's tough, isn't it? The former have a financial interest and bias while the latter has no financial interest or bias. (Unless, of course, you believe that the police are "in on it," because most police are men, and you know how we all stick together. . . .)

There's more. "Detectives don't usually make a big deal out of it because they don't want real victims to be reluctant to come forward."

OK, now we're seeing the true colors of our law enforcement officials. They would rather allow false rape claims than give up the chance to nab a rapist. Even though men and boys falsely accused of this vile crime have been beaten and killed and have killed themselves; they've been fired from their jobs and lost their businesses; they've lost their wives, their girlfriends and their long-time buddies. Rarely do they ever come out of it whole, and for many, the ghost of a false rape claim trails them for the rest of their lives.

And here is the kicker: "I'd rather work 20 false reports than lose one legitimate case because someone was fearful they wouldn't be believed," said Sgt. Gary Stansill.

And there you have it. The triumph of misandry. Men and boys falsely accused of this most vile crime are collateral damage in the war on rape. Of those twenty false rape claims the Sergeant is willing to accept, how many do you suppose will actually target a real-life man or boy? Certainly not all twenty, but some. Some men or boys will be questioned, and a few might even be arrested. And, yes, there is a possibility that an innocent man or boy will be convicted and will serve years in prison for a crime he didn't commit. All because nobody cracks down on false rape claims. All because they are rarely punished because police don't want to "make a big deal out of it." All because police are willing to accept false rape claims so as not to discourage actual victims from coming forward.

Funny, we are ever so concerned about rape accusers not coming forward, but for all the ordeal of making a rape claim, this somehow doesn't discourage the false accusers from coming forward, does it? The fact is, making a rape claim is as easy as it's ever been -- with news media anonymity for accusers (not for accuseds); exemption from polygraphs (only for accusers, not for accuseds); rape kits preserved for years by tax dollars; often unlimited statutes of limitations (in contrast, false rape claims have a limited statute of limitations); sexual assault counselors paid for by tax and tuition dollars (but no aids for false rape claim victims); Fed.R.Evid. 413 (which allows evidence in a rape trial of even rape claims for which the man was acquitted years earlier); and rape shield laws (sometimes applied to prevent the accused from mounting a fair defense) -- reporting is perhaps as easy as it can be while preserving the semblance of due process protections for the accused. Yet we still repeat this mantra about how terribly difficult it is for rape victims to come forward.

Newsflash: false rape claims are often not a victimless crime. But for what other crime would we actually hear police say they welcome it to be committed?

The Tulsa police force has just invited young women in the Tulsa area to commit this vile crime with impunity. And, yeah, yeah, yeah -- "we'll punish them if we happen to arrest some poor hapless guy." That's great consolation to the poor hapless guy, isn't it? "Don't worry, son, if you can prove that you've been wrongfully arrested on the basis of a lie, we'll go after your false accuser with a misdemeanor charge! Hell, she might even get three months probation -- after you've rotted in jail for a year or two." Young men beware -- you have just been officially sacrificed on the altar of political correctness. The Tulas Police have declared that you are fair game.

But, hey, at least the police are honest here. They don't pretend that false rape claims are "a myth," as does the gender-feminist, sexual-assault-industrial complex.

They are honest that false rape claims are rampant.

They just don't care to do anything about it.

HERE IS THE NEWS STORY

Tulsa Woman Falsely Reported Rape

By Lori Fullbright, The News On 6

TULSA, OK -- It turns out a report from a woman found under a porch was mostly false. The woman had claimed she was kidnapped and raped. Tulsa Police say much of her story was a lie and they are frustrated they spent so much time and effort on the case.

The story was heart-wrenching and scary all at the same time. A man and his mother found a woman crying out for help underneath their porch. She told them and police she'd been walking when she was kidnapped, held for two days and sexually assaulted inside a nearby house.

Police say she wasn't kidnapped. Several witnesses confirm the man picked her up at her home.

Detectives say they can also prove she wasn't assaulted inside the home, either. The man involved, saw the story on the news and went to police before they even called him.

He told them it was a consensual encounter from the beginning."

"It's just a fact, in sexual assault investigations, that we have false reports," said Tulsa Police Sgt. Gary Stansill of the Sex Crimes Unit.

Police rarely ask for charges to be filed against false reporters, unless someone ended up being falsely arrested or the case took a lot of time and effort, like this one.

"Probably 50-60 man-hours," said Sgt. Gary Stansill. "Estimate probably at least $2,000- $3,000, maybe more."

False rape reports are a big taboo subject.

Advocate groups estimate only 2% are false, but police departments believe it's much higher, in some places, half or more. Detectives don't usually make a big deal out of it because they don't want real victims to be reluctant to come forward.

"I'd rather work 20 false reports than lose one legitimate case because someone was fearful they wouldn't be believed," said Sgt. Gary Stansill.

The Good Samaritan in the case says learning the truth will make her think twice before offering help to someone else in the future.

Police say people have different reasons for filing false reports: emotional problems, revenge, to cover up for something they shouldn't have been doing. If the woman is charged with filing a false police report, it would be a misdemeanor.

Link: http://www.newson6.com/Global/story.asp?S=10260320