Sunday, March 1, 2009

". . . failing to consider the accuser may be intentionally lying effectively eradicates the presumption of innocence."

Dr. Bruce Gross, in a recent scholarly piece in the Annals of the American Psychotherapy Associaton, deftly gets his arms around the false rape phenomenon. He ends on this sobering call for rationality that mirrors the goals of this Web site:

"Although it may not be 'politically correct' to question the veracity of a women's complaint of rape, failing to consider the accuser may be intentionally lying effectively eradicates the presumption of innocence. This Constitutional right is especially significant when dealing with allegations of rape as in most jurisdictions, sex offenses are the only crimes that do not require corroborating evidence for conviction. Because there are often no witnesses and no physical evidence (especially if the victim delays in filing a report), the case may come down to the credibility of the accused versus the credibility of the accuser.

"There is a fine line between supporting victims and protecting the rights of the accused. Yet, considering the unique challenges of trying and defending rape cases combined with the potential costs to the falsely accused, being able to assess the credibility of the alleged victim takes on special importance."

Bruce Gross, False Rape Allegations: An Assault on Justice, Annals of the American Psychotherapy Associaton, Dec. 22, 2008.