Thursday, June 12, 2008

Flashback: Men falsely accused of rape can gain from the experience. Say what?

Imagine reading this in a national news magazine article:

Carl Comins argues that women who are raped can sometimes gain from the experience. "They have a lot of pain, but it is not a pain that I would necessarily have spared them. I think it ideally initiates a process of self-exploration. 'How do I see men?'"

Of course you would NEVER read that. The actual famous quote is from a 1991 Time Magazine article by a Catherine Comins, then a vice president at Vassar. She was discussing men who are victimized by false allegations of rape:

Comins argues that men who are unjustly accused can sometimes gain from the experience. "They have a lot of pain, but it is not a pain that I would necessarily have spared them. I think it ideally initiates a process of self-exploration. 'How do I see women?' 'If I didn't violate her, could I have?' 'Do I have the potential to do to her what they say I did?' Those are good questions."

No, Catherine, the only "good question" this raises is how did Vassar come to hire a monstrous human being like you?

And, yes, men falsely accused gain from the experience. They gain a life-long distrust of women, of the judicial process, of the Constitution, and of everything they reasonably had the right to rely on.

How dare you denigrate innocent men by dismissing their victimization as trivial. Man haters such as you, madam, are not fit to be teaching, raising, or even living near our sons.