Sunday, June 29, 2008

British county police believed 45% of all rape claims 'hadn't taken place'

On it's face, the story reprinted below is a silly, politically correct piece about a silly police department being pressured to treat rape "more seriously." A silly police officer makes inane comments about how the department treats rape like murder (except, sir, murder is by any objective measure a far more serious offense, and the only reason you would equate rape with murder is in a bow to women's groups). And he parrots an unreliable number about under-reported rapes. (You know the canard: there must be under-reporting because no one is reporting all these rapes that must be occurring, thus proving that rape is rampant. Right.) On and on it goes.

But read between the lines of this silly story and, I am sure unintentionally, the silly police officer confirmed something that that Prof. Eugen J. Kanin, the Purdue sociologist, demonstrated in his landmark false rape study in 1994. The story says: "Between April 2006 and March 2007, 240 allegations of rape were made in Dorset and 132 of these allegations were recorded as crimes." What does that mean? The police officer quoted in the story tells us what it means: "If it was thought that a reported rape hadn't taken place, it wasn't recorded as a crime."

Did you get that? So, of 240 allegations of rape, the police department thought 108 hadn't taken place. Hmm. That's 45%. Remember Professor Kanin's famous study: in a Midwestern town of 70,000, 41% of 109 rape complainants eventually admitted to police that no rape had occurred.

Isn't it ironic that in a piece intending to show how pro-women and anti-rape the police force is, it also shows that the police force itself believes a significant percentage of rape claims are false?

And thus the necessity for this Web site.

HERE IS THE STORY:

Care plan for rape victims

By Paula Roberts

Detective Superintendent Mark Cooper, head of Dorset Police's public protection unit, said under Operation Opal the force now has specially trained officers who deal with investigations of rape.

"If someone reports a rape it is dealt with utmost importance. It is treated like a murder incident as one of the most serious crimes that has been committed," he said.

Between April 2006 and March 2007, 240 allegations of rape were made in Dorset and 132 of these allegations were recorded as crimes. Of these, 35 were detected, a 26.5 per cent detection rate.

And in the same period the following year, 255 allegations were made in Dorset and 210 were recorded as crimes. Of these, 38 were detected resulting in an 18.5 per cent detection rate.

Det Supt Coooper said that previously, if it was thought that a reported rape hadn't taken place, it wasn't recorded as a crime. But that has since changed and every report is crimed and investigated.

"It is not that we weren't taking rape seriously before, it is just that we have improved the way we deal with rape investigations," he said.

On average, 240 allegations of rape are made in Dorset each year but the British Crime Survey states that the reported figure only equates to between 15 to 25 per cent of the rapes that happen - so up to 1,000 rapes could be taking place in the county.

Link: http://www.bournemouthecho.co.uk/display.var.2350138.0.care_plan_for_rape_victims.php